Dunsfold fast taxi

Any VC10 related discussions.....
Post Reply
jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:58 pm

Hi

I had a really enjoyable time at Dunsfold a few weeks ago and I've just been shown a really excellent video of it.
During the video I noticed that only two of the throttles were advanced to maximum while the remaining two were only pushed forward a little during the high speed abort. Can someone tell me the reason for this? I'm sure there is a perfectly good reason but just wondered.

Best wishes
Jon

User avatar
1103
Posts: 154
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:14 pm
Location: About 5 miles from Wisley Airfield

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by 1103 » Tue Sep 06, 2016 5:52 pm

Hi Jon,

There are a couple of reasons.

1. Compared to Brunty Dunsfold's runway is short so we can't apply the power for too long before we have to start applying the brakes.

2. Last year we found by applying power to all 4 engines meant that by the time we reached the start of the crowd line we had reached our speed limit and had to throttle back. By only powering up two engines to full power the acceleration is slower so the crowd get the noise & power for a longer distance along the crowd line.

I hope that answers you question. If you have other questions please feel free to ask.

Paul

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Tue Sep 06, 2016 10:22 pm

Many thanks for the reply. What do you mean by compered to Brunty, I'm not sure what your refering to?

User avatar
1103
Posts: 154
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:14 pm
Location: About 5 miles from Wisley Airfield

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by 1103 » Wed Sep 07, 2016 11:46 am

Hi Jon - I was alluding to the fact Brunty has a much longer runway than Dunsfold which enables the 241 group to give 241 more welly for longer on their high speed runs and they don't have to apply the brakes so heavily afterwards, thus reducing the risk of the brakes overheating.

Jelle Hieminga
Webmaster
Posts: 749
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2002 9:03 pm
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Jelle Hieminga » Wed Sep 07, 2016 1:21 pm

Brunty = Bruntingthorpe Airfield. ;-)
Buttons . . . check. Dials . . . check. Switches . . . check. Little
colored lights . . . check.

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Wed Sep 07, 2016 8:36 pm

Yes, after reading some of the material on this website I now realise there is another intact airframe at Bruntingthorpe. I now know what 1103 meant by Brunty.

Charlie
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:06 pm
Location: Lincoln

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Charlie » Mon Sep 12, 2016 7:53 pm

1103 wrote:Hi Jon - I was alluding to the fact Brunty has a much longer runway than Dunsfold which enables the 241 group to give 241 more welly for longer on their high speed runs and they don't have to apply the brakes so heavily afterwards, thus reducing the risk of the brakes overheating.
Indeed. Bruntingthorpe's runway is effectively a 9000ft (almost 3km) unrestricted strip. Even at higher speeds (60-80kts if the wind is favourable) the brakes are only needed approaching taxi speed.

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Mon Sep 12, 2016 9:57 pm

Thank you for the reply. Makes sense to save on wear and tear.

Do you routinely achieve 80kts during a high speed abort?

Charlie
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:06 pm
Location: Lincoln

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Charlie » Fri Sep 16, 2016 1:11 pm

jonpainter wrote:Thank you for the reply. Makes sense to save on wear and tear.

Do you routinely achieve 80kts during a high speed abort?
Not regularly, but it isn't unusual if the conditions are right.

It's also worth noting it's not an "abort" as such. To most pilots that means stopping the aeroplane as quickly as possible (reversers, brakes etc). It's a controlled slow deceleration mainly using reverse thrust to minimise wear on the brakes and the maximum speed is always pre-briefed before the run dependent on conditions on the day.

Keeping the speed at 80kts and below keeps it easier as the aircraft is still controlled using the tiller and "the lifting surfaces" aren't really that effective yet (in service the handling pilot would steer using the tiller/nosewheel up to 80kts, then use the rudder pedals/rudder thereafter)!

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Sun Sep 18, 2016 11:07 am

Thanks Charlie

Is there anything else that you do differently now to what you would have done while she was in service?

It must be really good to be involved in the preservation of these magnificent aircraft.

Jon

Charlie
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:06 pm
Location: Lincoln

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Charlie » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:43 pm

jonpainter wrote:Thanks Charlie

Is there anything else that you do differently now to what you would have done while she was in service?

It must be really good to be involved in the preservation of these magnificent aircraft.

Jon
Not too much - although we don't have a navigator to read out the checklists!

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:45 pm

How many people does it take to keep an aircraft like this alive and well? I presume you are all somehow connected to the aircraft?

Charlie
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:06 pm
Location: Lincoln

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Charlie » Mon Sep 19, 2016 7:45 pm

jonpainter wrote:How many people does it take to keep an aircraft like this alive and well? I presume you are all somehow connected to the aircraft?
A reasonable number! It's a mix of former aircrew, former ground crew and an eclectic range of enthusiasts each with a different connection or affection for the VC10 who relish the opportunity to get hands on with such a beautiful aircraft.

jonpainter
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by jonpainter » Tue Sep 20, 2016 2:59 pm

Charlie wrote:
jonpainter wrote:How many people does it take to keep an aircraft like this alive and well? I presume you are all somehow connected to the aircraft?
A reasonable number! It's a mix of former aircrew, former ground crew and an eclectic range of enthusiasts each with a different connection or affection for the VC10 who relish the opportunity to get hands on with such a beautiful aircraft.
Are you talking 20 people? How did you come to be involved in such a project? I only recently found out about these beautiful aircraft being preserved after a trip to Wings and Wheels and it was there one of the guides told me about this website. Its interesting to hear from those that take their time to preserve the aircraft.

What sort of maintenance do you carry out? Again does it differ much from what would have been carried while the aircraft was active?

Charlie
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2007 8:06 pm
Location: Lincoln

Re: Dunsfold fast taxi

Post by Charlie » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:04 pm

jonpainter wrote:
Are you talking 20 people? How did you come to be involved in such a project? I only recently found out about these beautiful aircraft being preserved after a trip to Wings and Wheels and it was there one of the guides told me about this website. Its interesting to hear from those that take their time to preserve the aircraft.
Around that ballpark. I'm former aircrew which is how I came to be involved.
What sort of maintenance do you carry out? Again does it differ much from what would have been carried while the aircraft was active?
I'll let a better qualified person answer that. Basically the aircraft is kept as serviceable as possible within the resources available. If there are snags, we fix them. I'm sure Dunsfold do the same (being very aware of thread creep!).

Post Reply